Always Start With The Rx

Anytime you're going to select a new frame it's best to start by looking at the prescription.  If you have a simple prescription then you may not need to worry about this, but for those that have a power that is over plus or minus 2 diopters the frame choice will have a direct influence on the eyeglasses function, weight and cosmetic appearance.

Table Of Contents - Make a selection or scroll down

High Minus (Nearsighted)

Being Myopic (aka Nearsighted) generally produces lenses with 3 distinct characteristics:

  • Thickness on the outside edge of the lens and a thin center

  • Flatter front surface curve (aka Base Curve)

  • Makes the wearers eye appear smaller than they really are

If your prescription is over a - 3.00 then you're getting into what would be considered a high minus power.

Due to the increased thickness on the edges, round is the ideal shape.  Not everyone likes round so rectangular shapes with rounded corners is the next best shape. 

Avoid Going Too Wide: The wider the frame, the more thickness there will be.  

 

Avoid Half-Rim: This style of frame often requires the lenses to be grooved and thus prevents the lenses from being produced as thin as possible.

Avoid Complete Rimless: Depending on the style of the rimless frame and the degree of your corrective power, you may be ineligible for this type of frame.  The thickness of the lens may prevent a secure mount.  Another reason this isn't a popular option is because the thickness has nowhere to hide; the full thickness of the lens is on display for all to see.

 

High Plus (Farsighted)

 

Hyperopia (aka Farsighted) generally produces lenses with 3 distinct characteristics:

  • Thickness in the center of the lens and thin edges

  • Steeper front surface curve (aka Base Curve)

  • Makes the wearers eyes appear to be larger than they actually are

If your prescription is over a +2.50 then you're getting into what would be considered a high plus power.

With the concentration of thickness in the center a small frame size will help but most of the weight and thickness will have to be managed through the lens material.

 

Avoid Half-Rim: This style of frame often requires the lenses to be grooved and thus prevents the lenses from being produced as thin as possible.

Avoid Complete Rimless: Depending on the style of the rimless frame and the degree of your corrective power, you may be ineligible for this type of frame.  Rimless frames require a minimum edge thickness and so the lenses may need to be intentionally made thicker in order allow for a secure mount.

Presbyopia

You can be nearsighted, farsighted or even have perfect vision and you'll eventually have Presbyopia.  Presbyopia is also known as Age Related Farsightedness and it typically starts around the age of 40.​

Our eyes would normally accommodate to focus on objects up close but as we get older this becomes more difficult.  When the time comes your doctor will prescribe an Additional Power (aka Add Power). 

You will have to choose between these 4 options:

  • Progressives

  • Bi-focals

  • Tri-focals

  • Single Vision Reading

 

Avoid "Shallow" Frames For Multifocals: An optician can usually fit a multifocal into just about any frame but you'll want to avoid shapes that have a short vertical height.  This dimension is called the B Measurement.

As a general guide, try to select a shape that has a B Measurement of at least 30mm.  This will allow enough room for the distance, intermediate and reading portion of your lens.

If you elect to go with Single Vision Reading lenses then you can go as small as you like; just be aware that the smaller you go the more aware of the frame you will be.  This can annoy some people.

 

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